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Posted 1w ago by @Nastia.am

❗️Check your money trees❗️
✨Many money trees come with these bands tying together the trunks✨

🌿These “deathbands” restrict the plant from growing any further🌿
❗️Make sure to check underneath the soil for the bands and cut them with sterile scissors ❗️ #healthyandhappy #HappyPlants #PlantsMakePeopleHappy #PlantAddict #PlantTherapy
Best Answer
@Nastia.am That’s right, you should also see that all the trunks are still viable and not completely dried out and “papery” feeling! If that’s the case the trunk is not capable of transporting water to the branches and leaves and your plant is doomed!😱😥😪
Let me know if it grows money for more plants😂
@Ms.Persnickety thank you! All of them are viable but one trunk. I was going to get rid of the one trunk. If one trunk is affected does that mean the others won’t grow as well or only that trunk?
@Nastia.am I’m not sure but I believe at this point I would check out the root system, if the two viable trunks have a healthy root system I’d say it is okay to repot the two healthy trunks and get rid of the dried out one because at that stage it won’t recover, good luck!!
How to Revive a Dying Money Tree After Repotting
The right watering schedule is crucial after repotting a money tree as it is important to prevent the soil from drying out too much so the roots have plenty of access to water whilst they adjust. Water as often are required so that the money tree’s potting soil is evenly and consistently moist (but not saturated) to mitigate any drought stress as the roots are establishing.
Increase the humidity with a humidifier or by misting the money twice a day. A humidifier is the most effective way to ensure the right level of humidity around your money tree (around 30% humidity is optimal) By creating a humid micro-climate around your money tree, the rate of transpiration (water loss) from the leaves should be significantly reduce which helps to alleviate drought stress. Even if the leaves have dropped, a more humid atmosphere around your money tree creates the optimal conditions for new leaves to grow.
Maintain a reasonably cool temperature and keep the money tree out of draughts or air currents. As drought stress is the biggest threat to your money tree after repotting, a cooler indoor temperature away from direct sunlight can help reduce evaporation and help to save the plant.
As long as you take good care of your money tree by recreating some of its preferred natural conditions the leaves should perk up and new leaves should begin to emerge in the next few weeks as the roots adjust.

(Read my article, how to save a money tree with yellow leaves).

Key Takeaways:
Usually the reasons for a dying money tree are overwatering, underwatering, low humidity excessively hot or cold temperatures or too much sun. Money tree leaves turn yellow and drop off due to root rot caused by overwatering whereas the leaves wilt and turn brown due to low humidity and dry soil.
Money trees leaves turn yellow and droop due to excess water around the roots which causes root rot. Overwatering, or pots without drainage holes in the base are the most common reasons for a money tree developing root rot causing the leaves to turn yellow with a dying appearance.


Brown leaves on a money tree indicate the soil is too dry or the humidity is too low. Money trees are native to the tropics and prefer at least 30% humidity and consistently moist soil. If the soil is too dry the money tree’s leaves wilt, turn brown and drop off with a dying appearance.
Money trees drop their leaves if the soil is too dry or too wet, the humidity is too low, the temperature is lower then 53.6°F or due to a lack of light. In Fall and Winter money trees can drop their leaves due to less hours of daylight, however the leaves regrow in Spring if conditions are optimal.


To revive a dying money tree, recreate the conditions of the money tree’s natural environment with 30% humidity, temperatures between 53.6°F and 77°F and water the money tree as often as required so that the soil is consistently moist. Once the conditions are preferable, the leaves should revive and perk up in the following weeks.
Excellent tip Nastia!

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